Can Rooibos Red Tea Really Help Reduce Food Cravings?

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Rooibos is claimed to help reduce cravings and to be rich in anti-oxidants

Mid-afternoon I love to relax with a small pot of Earl Gray. But I could be persuaded to give rooibos tea a try if the claims about its health benefits are true.

If you hadn’t heard, rooibos tea is the latest health craze spreading through healthy eating blogs and social media.

Rooibos tea originates in South Africa. In its native country it’s a popular drink for relieving cravings and reducing hunger.

Yet it’s popularity has since spread around the world because it contains zero calories, zero fat, zero sugar, and it has almost no caffeine.

In other words, it’s the ideal replacement for coffee or soda if you want to lose weight and improve your health.

And it gets better. Because Dr. Josh Axe says that rooibos also “contains highly effective antioxidants that fight a large range of diseases. In fact, there is almost no part of your body that doesn’t benefit from rooibos.

In its native South Africa, a lot of research has been done on the health benefits of rooibos tea.

This includes research at the Medical Research Council of South Africa.

Senior scientist Jeanine Marnewick says that their research revealed, “Rooibos showed protective effects against DNA damage when tested in an in vitro assay as well as in an in vivo (dissection) animal system.”
This finding has been backed by a team of Japanese scientists from the Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo. They concluded that “Rooibos tea may prevent DNA damage and inflammation by its anti-oxidative activity in vivo.”

With all these science backed health benefits, it’s now wonder rooibos has become so popular with Western dieters.

In fact, you can now find it being sold in Starbucks and on the shelves of many large food stores.

So if you’re a tea drinker and eager to lose some weight, while reducing your cravings and increasing your levels of antioxidants, rooibos tea is certainly worth trying.

But before you rush off to get a box of this refreshing weight loss tea, there’s a rooibos red tea recipe some say offers even more health benefits than off-the-shelf brands.

Rooibos Helps One Woman While Recovering from Postnatal Depression

Liz Swann Miller first discovered rooibos while on safari in Kenya to try and recover from her post-natal depression.

Like many new mothers, Liz had struggled with low moods and feeling unattractive from the pregnancy weight she’d found impossible to lose.

So when Liz was given a cup of rooibos tea by a local villager and she experienced how her cravings seemed to fade and she felt suddenly more revitalised, she knew this tea contained something special.

She asked the villager for the recipe.

But they refused to give it to her, saying she’d have to speak to the village’s elder if she wanted to know how they made their tea. Because this was no ordinary rooibos tea.

Long story short, Liz was able to get hold of the recipe and did extensive research into its ingredients. She discovered its able to:

  • Force fat cells to open up and release harmful toxins
  • Reduce stress hormones like cortisol
  • Release fat to be burned for energy and muscle growth
  • Reduce hunger and sugar cravings

After finding this out, Liz knew she couldn’t keep the recipe a secret. And created a video to share what’s in the recipe so anyone who wants to can try it.

Since creating the video, Liz says as many as 14,800 people have now successfully lowered their belly fat, balanced their hormones, and revitalised their immunity thanks to this obscure rooibos red tea recipe.

>>>Click here to watch Liz’s video on how she discovered a rooibos red tea recipe that’s since helped over 14,800 people slim down with fewer cravings

Disclaimer: Statements made in this article have not been approved or verified by the FDA. This information is not intended to be a substitute or replacement for any medical treatment. Please seek the advice of a healthcare professional for your specific health concerns. Individual results may vary. This is an advertisement and not a blog or article.


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